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More about your developer environment

Introducing atelier

As a Lino developer you are using atelier, a minimalist developer project management tool. A project, for atelier, is a directory containing at least a file tasks.py.

You “activate” a project by opening a terminal and changing to its directory. That’s all. Almost all. Read on.

  • An atelier project usually corresponds to a public code repository (using Git or Mercurial). But you can have unpublished projects that have no repo at all.

  • One atelier project can contain one or more demo projects.

  • An atelier project usually corresponds to a given Python package to be published on PyPI.

  • An atelier project can have a number of Sphinx document trees (default is one tree named docs).

Your atelier projects don’t need to be under a single base directory. You will have different project base directories. One of them is ~/lino/lino_local, but another one is ~/lino/env/repositories:

~/lino/env/repositories

The base directory for every repository you cloned from GitLab.

Configuring atelier

To get a full Lino developer environment, you must tell atelier the list of your projects. That’s done in your ~/.atelier/config.py file. You must create this file yourself, manually:

$ mkdir ~/.atelier
$ nano ~/.atelier/config.py

Add the following content:

from pathlib import Path
for root in ["~/lino/lino_local", "~/lino/env/repositories"]:
    for p in Path(root).expanduser().iterdir():
        if p.is_dir():
            add_project(str(p))

Letting atelier know where your projects are has the advantage that you can run the per_project script (or its alias pp) to run a given command over many projects.

Usage examples

You can now play around in your “environment”.

See a list of your atelier projects:

$ pp -l
========= ========= ==========================================
 Project   Status    URL
--------- --------- ------------------------------------------
 lino      master!   http://www.lino-framework.org
 xl        master    http://www.lino-framework.org
 noi       master    http://noi.lino-framework.org
 cosi      master    http://cosi.lino-framework.org
 avanti    master    http://avanti.lino-framework.org/
 vilma     master    http://vilma.lino-framework.org
 care      master    http://care.lino-framework.org
 tera      master    http://tera.lino-framework.org
 book      master!   http://www.lino-framework.org
 voga      master    http://voga.lino-framework.org
 welfare   master    https://welfare.lino-framework.org
 amici     master    http://amici.lino-framework.org
========= ========= ==========================================

Change to ~/lino/env/repositories/lino and download the latest version of Lino:

$ go lino
$ git pull

Do the same for all your cloned repositories:

$ pp git pull

Run the full test suite in Developer Guide:

$ go book
$ inv prep test

Build a local copy of the html documentation Developer Guide:

$ go book
$ inv bd

Afterwards you can start your browser on the generated output:

$ firefox docs/.build/index.html

Building the docs might not work out of the box, it is a topic of its own. See Building the Lino docs.

It happens that I type the following before leaving my computer for getting a cup of coffee:

$ pp inv prep test bd

Bash aliases installed by getlino

Remember that a file ~.lino_bash_aliases was created in Install your Lino developer environment and we asked you to source it from within your ~/.bash_aliases or ~/.bashrc file.

~/.lino_bash_aliases

Contains several aliases and shell functions.

When installing Lino on a production server it is a system-wide file in /etc/getlino/lino_bash_aliases.

The following command aliases are installed by ~/.lino_bash_aliases:

go

cd to one of your local project directories using its nickname.

In case you also use the Go programming language on your computer, you should obviously edit your pick another name than “go”.

The go command is a shell function in your ~/.lino_bash_aliases and looks like this:

function go() {
    for BASE in ~/lino/lino_local ~/lino/env/repositories ~/lino/env/repositories/book/lino_book/projects
    do
      if [ -d $BASE/$1 ] ; then
        cd $BASE/$1;
        return;
      fi
    done
    echo Oops: no project $1
    return -1
}

So there are three “types” of nicknames:

$ go lino   #  cd ~/lino/env/repositories/lino
$ go first  #  cd ~/lino/lino_local/first
$ go min1   #  cd ~/lino/env/repositories/book/lino_book/projects/min1

Note how the for BASE in of the go command also loops over the directory ~/lino/env/repositories/book/lino_book/projects. This directory contains our demo projects.

runserver

An alias for LINO_LOGLEVEL=DEBUG python manage.py runserver

pm

An alias for python manage.py, in other words for executing a django-admin command.

This alias is installed by getlino configure.

a

Expands to . env/bin/activate.

This alias is installed by getlino configure.

pywhich

Shortcut to quickly show where the source code of a Python module is coming from.

This is useful e.g. when you are having troubles with your virtual environments.

The pywhich command is actually also a simply shell function:

function pywhich() {
  python -c "import $1; print($1.__file__)"
}

How to change the location of your repositories

The following it not much tested. Read and follow at your own risk or together with your mentor.

Imagine that for some reason you want to trash your virtualenv and create it anew. The longest waiting time when you installed your developer environment was to download all the repositories from GitLab. You can avoid downloading them again by moving your repositories to another location and to inform getlino about it by saying getlino configure --repos-base:

$ mv ~/lino/env/repositories ~/
$ getlino configure --repos-base ~/repositories

The getlino command has a quite primitive user interface. But it is less stupid that the first impression might leave. For example it knows that it has been run before:

This is getlino version 24.3.0 running on Ubuntu 22.04.4 LTS (ubuntu jammy).
This will write to configuration file /home/luc/.getlino.conf

Basically you just answer ENTER to every question, or y when ENTER doesn’t continue. Sometimes you can skip a step by answering n, for example when it asks to “run sudo apt-get update -y;sudo apt-get upgrade -y;” and you know that you did that recently.

You will also see that the answer to the question about repos_base is set to what you specified at the command-line:

- repos_base (Base directory for shared code repositories) [~/repositories]:

At some moment you should see:

Clone repositories to /home/luc/work ? [y or n] Yes
No need to clone atelier : directory exists.
No need to clone etgen : directory exists.
No need to clone eid : directory exists.
No need to clone cd : directory exists.
No need to clone getlino : directory exists.
No need to clone lino : directory exists.
No need to clone xl : directory exists.
No need to clone welfare : directory exists.
No need to clone react : directory exists.
No need to clone openui5 : directory exists.
No need to clone book : directory exists.
No need to clone cg : directory exists.
No need to clone ug : directory exists.
No need to clone hg : directory exists.
No need to clone lf : directory exists.
No need to clone ss : directory exists.
No need to clone algus : directory exists.
No need to clone amici : directory exists.
No need to clone avanti : directory exists.
No need to clone cms : directory exists.
No need to clone care : directory exists.
No need to clone cosi : directory exists.
No need to clone mentori : directory exists.
No need to clone noi : directory exists.
No need to clone presto : directory exists.
No need to clone pronto : directory exists.
No need to clone tera : directory exists.
No need to clone shop : directory exists.
No need to clone vilma : directory exists.
No need to clone voga : directory exists.
No need to clone weleup : directory exists.
No need to clone welcht : directory exists.

How to switch to the development version of atelier

This section is not needed and not much tested. Read and follow at your own risk.

The atelier package had been automatically installed together with lino. That is, you are using the PyPI version of Atelier. That’s usually okay because Atelier is more or less stable. But one day we might decide that you should rather switch to the development version.

Doing this is theoretically easy. Uninstall the PyPI version and then install the development version:

$ pip uninstall atelier

$ cd ~/lino/env/repositories
$ git clone https://github.com/lino-framework/atelier.git
$ pip install -e atelier

How to send emails from your developer environment

The demo sites of a developer environment don’t send any emails to the outside world. The test suite uses different techniques to simulate sending emails. But even as a Lino developer you might want to really send emails. For example when you develop or debug some action that sends emails and you want to really send them out. Or maybe you run your own production site on your developer machine.

The related Django settings (for example EMAIL_HOST_USER and EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD) contain information that only you can give. And you don’t want to accidentally publish them. This is why you want to store them in your local settings module.

Note that not all demo projects use the local settings module. Only those which have the following lines in their settings.py file:

try:
    from lino_local.settings import *
except ImportError:
    pass

The local settings module

Your local settings module has been created by getlino configure in file ~/lino/lino_local/settings.py.

If you want Lino to find it, you need to set PYTHONPATH to ~/lino. For example by adding the following line to your .bashrc file:

export PYTHONPATH=/home/joe/lino

On a production server or for sites created with getlino startsite you don’t need to set PYTHONPATH because the manage.py script of these sites contains a line sys.path.insert(0, '/usr/local/lino').

Using the console email backend

Rather than actually sending out emails, you might prefer to simply see them on the console. You can achieve this by setting EMAIL_BACKEND as follows:

EMAIL_BACKEND = 'django.core.mail.backends.console.EmailBackend'

With that setting you can copy the console output to a file tmp.eml and then opene this file in Thunderbird.